ONCAlert | Upfront Therapy for mRCC

TRK Inhibition's Future Role in Precision Medicine

Targeted Oncology
Published Online:1:10 PM, Wed March 6, 2019

Shubham Pant, MD: That was a really, really interesting discussion, Dr Hong. Can you tell me any final thoughts that you might have, overall, to tie it all together? Where did this field start, where has it grown? Because you’ve seen the growth of this field from an infancy now to maybe not a teenager, but maybe in the early 20s. I think you’ve seen this, so where do you think this started and where do you think we are going?

David S. Hong, MD: It’s an incredibly exciting time in oncology. I think all of us see these announcements from ASCO [American Society of Clinical Oncologists] and from the FDA of new approvals almost every day. And it is challenging, I think, to keep track of all of this. There will be additional changes that emerge in the next several years, in the next decade or so. But I think it’s important to keep in light of all of this. I think, as we talked about tumor agnostic therapies, we will see more indications in the future. So it behooves the community oncologist, it behooves the oncologist, to understand this testing, which vendors can actually...

Shubham Pant, MD: Provide all the testing and everything, right?

David S. Hong, MD: And that’s incredibly important. And so I think that we will see a lot more changes in the next decade. And so keeping up with all these changes is incredible, not only just for obviously your education but for our patients.

Shubham Pant, MD: For our patients because I think this is just the tip of the iceberg, right?

David S. Hong, MD: Yes.

Shubham Pant, MD: More testing is going to be done, more targets are going to be found.

David S. Hong, MD: Yes.

Shubham Pant, MD: Even in those targets, if we can treat them with the current agents, they can gain resistance so we can test those tumors again, find if there’s resistant mutations, and try to see if we can target them again. So it’s this whole field that is going to grow. But it’s important to see that there are some approvals for the patients in this tumor agnostic approach.

David S. Hong, MD: Yes.

Shubham Pant, MD: Thank you, Dr Hong, for this insightful discussion, and thank you to our audience for watching this Targeted Oncology presentation on precision medicine.

Transcript edited for clarity.

Shubham Pant, MD: That was a really, really interesting discussion, Dr Hong. Can you tell me any final thoughts that you might have, overall, to tie it all together? Where did this field start, where has it grown? Because you’ve seen the growth of this field from an infancy now to maybe not a teenager, but maybe in the early 20s. I think you’ve seen this, so where do you think this started and where do you think we are going?

David S. Hong, MD: It’s an incredibly exciting time in oncology. I think all of us see these announcements from ASCO [American Society of Clinical Oncologists] and from the FDA of new approvals almost every day. And it is challenging, I think, to keep track of all of this. There will be additional changes that emerge in the next several years, in the next decade or so. But I think it’s important to keep in light of all of this. I think, as we talked about tumor agnostic therapies, we will see more indications in the future. So it behooves the community oncologist, it behooves the oncologist, to understand this testing, which vendors can actually...

Shubham Pant, MD: Provide all the testing and everything, right?

David S. Hong, MD: And that’s incredibly important. And so I think that we will see a lot more changes in the next decade. And so keeping up with all these changes is incredible, not only just for obviously your education but for our patients.

Shubham Pant, MD: For our patients because I think this is just the tip of the iceberg, right?

David S. Hong, MD: Yes.

Shubham Pant, MD: More testing is going to be done, more targets are going to be found.

David S. Hong, MD: Yes.

Shubham Pant, MD: Even in those targets, if we can treat them with the current agents, they can gain resistance so we can test those tumors again, find if there’s resistant mutations, and try to see if we can target them again. So it’s this whole field that is going to grow. But it’s important to see that there are some approvals for the patients in this tumor agnostic approach.

David S. Hong, MD: Yes.

Shubham Pant, MD: Thank you, Dr Hong, for this insightful discussion, and thank you to our audience for watching this Targeted Oncology presentation on precision medicine.

Transcript edited for clarity.
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