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Background of the Prophage G-200 Vaccine for Recurrent Glioblastoma Multiforme

Andrew T. Parsa MD, PhD
Published Online:6:57 PM, Fri September 13, 2013
Andrew T. Parsa MD, PhD, Associate Professor in Residence of Neurological Surgery, University of California, San Francisco, discusses the background of the prophage G-200 vaccine for recurrent glioblastoma multiforme.

Research in this space originated from the immunologist Pramod Srivastava, MD, PhD. In the 1980s, Parsa says, Srivastava discovered that heat shock proteins carry peptides that are able to provoke a tumor-specific immune response. Research was then conducted to define the mechanism and move G-200 into the clinical realm.

Currently, Parsa is the study chair for the Alliance-sponsored clinical trial. Parsa also says that he is the most experienced clinician with G-200 in brain tumor patients and was the principal investigator in phase I and phase II studies. These studies led to the randomized, three-arm, phase II Alliance trial.

This is an exciting time, Parsa says, as G-200 offers hope of a specific immune response with minimal toxicity. Parsa says he would be surprised if trial endpoints were not met.

Clinical Pearls I
  • This research originated from the immunologist Pramod Srivastava, MD, PhD
  • It was discovered that heat shock proteins carry peptides that can provoke a tumor-specific immune response
Clinical Pearls II
  • Parsa is currently the study chair for the Alliance-sponsored clinical trial
  • Parsa was also a principal investigator in phase I and phase II studies
Clinical Pearls III
  • Prophage G-200 offers hope of a specific immune response with minimal toxicity
  • Parsa says he would be surprised if clinical trial endpoints were not met
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