Addressing Myelotoxicity as a Consequence of Treatment for Extensive-Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer

EP. 6A: Benefits of Using Trilaciclib in Patients With Extensive-Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer in Clinical Practice

In the third video of the series, Dr. Jyoti Malhotra from the Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey shares expert insights on the benefits of using trilaciclib in clinical practice including considerations for chemotherapy treatment efficacy and patient quality of life. As of May 1, 2022, Dr. Malhotra is no longer with Rutgers Cancer Institute; she is now affiliated with City of Hope.



Trilaciclib was approved in 2021 for the treatment of patients with extensive-stage small-cell lung cancer who are receiving chemotherapy with either platinum-etoposide or topotecan. Through the approval of this drug, we now have an option to prevent chemotherapy-related myelosuppression in these patients, not just for preventing neutropenia but also anemia and thrombocytopenia because trilaciclib impacts and targets trilineage hematopoiesis, which is a big advantage.

The schedule of trilaciclib recommends that the drug is given intravenously on the same day that patients are getting chemotherapy. Patients don't have to come to clinic for additional visits. They get their treatments with this drug [on the] same day as their pre-planned trips for the other agents. The drug is relatively well-tolerated.

In patients who are at high risk for myelosuppression, such as elderly patients, such as patients who already have lower blood counts even before starting treatment because of tumor enrollment in their bone marrow, I strongly consider this drug. We also consider this drug in patients who are refractory to G-CSF (granulocyte colony-stimulating factor) during cycle 1.

The most significant benefit I would say is in terms of fewer treatment delays and interruptions and the ability to give full doses of chemotherapy to these patients, which is very crucial because small cell lung can cancer is an aggressive form of lung cancer, and we want to give patients as much of their plan treatment as possible at the optimum doses.