Fazal on Modalities to Lower the Risk of Acute and Chronic GVHD

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Salman Fazal, MD, discusses acute and chronic graft-versus-host-disease and younger match unrelated donor transplant for patients with cancer.

Salman Fazal, MD, director of the cell transplantation program in the division of hematology & cellular therapy at the Allegheny Health Network, discusses acute and chronic graft-versus-host-disease (GVHD) and younger match unrelated donor transplant for patients with cancer.

Transcription:

0:10 | Over the last few years, there has been a lot of interest in terms of using different modalities to lower the risk of acute and chronic graft-versus-host disease. I always feel that we would be performing more allogeneic stem cell transplantation for different diseases if there was no significant risk of acute or chronic graft-versus-host disease. In general, the matched donors prefer per cell transplantation, there have been different modalities or methods have been used to lower the risk of acute and chronic graft-versus-host disease. Historically, we have used strategies, which include calcineurin inhibitors and methotrexate to lower the risk of graft-versus-host disease.

0:58 | More recently, there was a study which compared tacrolimus and methotrexate with post-transplant cyclophosphamide to further lower the risk of graft-versus-host disease. We found that using post-transplant cyclophosphamide, even in matched related donors, led to lowering the risk of acute and chronic graft-versus-host disease. However, that study did not have the comparator arm with antithymocyte globulin, which is 1 of the other modalities that has been used to lower the risk of acute and chronic graft-versus-host disease.

1:35 | But as we all know, post-transplant cyclophosphamide came into the scene with the haploidentical transplantation, and now it is making its way in other types of transplantation, including measuring later donor transplantation. It has shown that it is an effective strategy in terms of both acute and chronic efforts. However, we do still see significant risk of both acute and chronic, although I believe that chronic graft-versus-host disease remains a challenge in terms of allogeneic stem cell transplantation.

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