Genetic Testing for Actionable Mutations in Newly-Diagnosed AML

Alice S. Mims, MD a hematologist at The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center, discusses testing and actionable mutations in newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia.

Alice S. Mims, MD a hematologist at The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center, discusses testing and actionable mutations in newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia (AML).

According to Mims, testing should be done on all patients upfront, in order to better inform treatment decisions. Additionally, testing has become quicker for FLT3, IDH, and TP53 mutations.

Novel agents such as CD47-targeting antibody therapy and CAR T cells have become more common in recent years. However, according to Mims, it’s important to keep in mind that most of these novel AML therapies are not curative. 

0:08 | What I'd like to say first and foremost is genetic testing really should be done on all patients upfront. It really helps us know what treatment options are available and leads to discussion with them about those options and helps them be more involved. There are some patients who can't wait necessarily for results to come back. But I think as we're getting faster and faster with getting results back, especially for those important mutations like an FLT3 mutation, IDH, TP53. What I hope is that those will all get to be a part of most patient’s discussions for treatment options.

0:49 | Some novel targets that are being looked are things such things targeting CD47 with antibody therapy on CD3, CD123 bytes. There's CAR T cells. So, there's a lot of different things that are ongoing that we hope will really make a difference. For these patients, especially as we continue to make progress, [it's important to remember] most of the therapies that have become available as of late are not curative.