An Analysis of the GOG-9929 Trial

Russell J. Schilder, MD, discusses the GOG-9929 trial.

Russell J. Schilder, MD, director, Gynecologic Medical Oncology, Thomas Jefferson University, Kimmel Cancer Center, discusses the GOG-9929 trial.

The purpose of the GOG-9929 trial is to study the side effects and best dose of ipilimumab when given following chemoradiation in patients with locally advanced cervical cancer.

Schilder explains that CTLA-4 is a receptor on T cells that dampens the cell’s activity, and causes them to not have an immune response. Treating cervical cancer patients with chemoradiation causes an antigen release, Schilder says, similar to an in situ vaccination. After the chemoradiation, ipilumamab will be administered to boost or enhance the immune response and produce a better clinical outcome.

Clinical Pearls

  • The GOG-9929 trial is studying the side effects and best dose of ipilimumab when given after chemoradiation therapy in patients with locally advanced cervical cancer
  • Ipilimumab is an anti-CTLA-4 agent that should help boost or enhance the immune response after chemoradiation treatment
  • Physicians hope that ipilumumab will provide a better clinical outcome in patients with locally advanced cervical