Bone Mineral Density a Concern for Common Prostate Cancer Therapy

Partners | <b>Florida Cancer Specialists</b>

Diane Cope, PhD, APRN, BC, AOCNP evaluates the bone health of men with prostate cancer undergoing androgen deprivation therapy in a recently published manuscript, “Nursing Considerations for Androgen Deprivation Therapy and Bone Health in Men Affected by Prostate Cancer."

Fort Myers, Fla., November 17, 2022 — Director of Nursing for Florida Cancer Specialists & Research Institute, LLC (FCS) Diane Cope, PhD, APRN, BC, AOCNP evaluates the bone health of men with prostate cancer undergoing androgen deprivation therapy and addresses its implications for nursing practice in a recently published manuscript, “Nursing Considerations for Androgen Deprivation Therapy and Bone Health in Men Affected by Prostate Cancer”.

Androgen deprivation regimens, known for slowing the progression of prostate cancer, are a widely used form of treatment. While survival rates have vastly improved, the therapy itself has been associated with bone mineral density (BMD) loss, which can often lead to additional health-related issues, such as osteoporosis and fractures.

In the manuscript, Cope notes that oncology nurses play a significant role in monitoring prostate cancer patients for potential adverse effects androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). “Bone fractures have an impact on daily living and diminish quality of life,” says Cope. “Oncology nurses can play a key role in patient and caregiver education regarding the importance of bone health management strategies and the assessment of patient-related risk factors that may limit adherence to treatment recommendations.”

According to the American Cancer Society, prostate cancer is the second most common cancer for men in the United States, with one in eight men being diagnosed, and is the second leading cause of cancer death in American men. Screening for prostate cancer is available in the form of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing, a blood test that determines the risk of prostate cancer based on the levels of these proteins.