Considering Mutations and Resistance in Lung Cancer to Improve Precision Medicine

January 21, 2021
Anne Chiang, MD

Anne Chiang, MD, associate professor, Medical Oncology, Yale School of Medicine, discusses hard-to-treat lung cancer and how due to recent lung cancer innovations and treatment options, the tumor is becoming increasingly heterogeneous. 

Anne Chiang, MD, associate professor, Medical Oncology, Yale School of Medicine, discusses hard-to-treat lung cancer and how due to recent lung cancer innovations and treatment options, the tumor is becoming increasingly heterogeneous. 

The discussion, which was held at the 2020 New York Lung Cancer Symposium, examines a series of case studies on challenging cases of lung cancer. According to Chiang, a better understanding of generic mutations combined with more treatment options has led to a more interesting conversation around hard-to-treat lung cancer.

Of the cases discussed by 4 different medical oncologists, 2 of the patients had different histologies in 2 different legions of the lungs. Other cases focused on how you continue to treat difficult cases over time and continue to effectively manage the tumor.

According to Chiang, both liquid and tissue biopsies should be utilized over the course of treatment. This will give care providers a clear idea of how the tumor progresses over time and develops resistance. Once care providers have a better idea of how the tumor is becoming resistant to certain treatment options, a more personalized plan can be created for the patient.