Dr. Oh Discusses the Use of Abiraterone and Docetaxel in Prostate Cancer

January 17, 2018
William K. Oh, MD

William K. Oh, MD, chief, Division of Hematology and Medical Oncology, professor of medicine and urology, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, discusses the use of abiraterone and docetaxel in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer. 

William K. Oh, MD, chief, Division of Hematology and Medical Oncology, professor of medicine and urology, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, discusses the use of abiraterone (Zytiga) and docetaxel (Taxotere) in patients with metastatic prostate cancer.

The management of metastatic hormone-sensitive prostate cancer has been one of the biggest developments in the treatment of advanced prostate cancer in the past several years, Oh says. The results of a large randomized trial, CHAARTED, which compared androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT) versus ADT plus 6 cycles of docetaxel in newly-diagnosed patients with hormone-sensitive disease were presented in 2014. It was a positive study, favoring the use of chemotherapy. The STAMPEDE study then confirmed those findings.

In 2017, the results of the LATITUDE study were presented. This large, randomized study compared ADT plus or minus abiraterone and showed a comparable benefit of up to 2 to 3 years of abieratone plus prednisone in the treatment of metastatic hormone-sensitive prostate cancer.

In total, there are now 4 clinical trials that have shown either docetaxel or abiraterone significantly improves survival compared to ADT alone. Now, the remaining question is which of these agents is better, Oh says.

Dr. Oh discussesthis treatment combination for prostate cancerin further detail.