Evaluating Glofitamab as a Potential Option for Patients With R/R LBCL

Cyrus M. Khan, MD, discusses the mechanism of action of glofitamab and its potential use as a treatment option for patients with relapsed/refractory large B-cell lymphoma.

Cyrus M. Khan, MD, hematologist in the Division of Hematology and Cellular Therapy at West Penn Hospital of Allegheny Health Network, discusses the mechanism of action of glofitamab (RG6026) and its potential use as a treatment option for patients with relapsed/refractory large B-cell lymphoma.

According to Khan, glofitamab is a CD20/CD3 T-cell-engaging bispecific monoclonal antibody. The agent is an off-the-shelf product which is administered via intravenous infusion to patients for a fixed duration of 12 cycles. The agent works by redirecting T cells to kill both normal and malignant B cells.

During a presentation given at the American Society of Hematology 2022 Annual Meeting, the expansion cohorts from a phase 1/2 study (NCT03075696) evaluating glofitamab demonstrated the agent to have a manageable safety profile within this patient population. Results also showed that treatment with glofitamab induced frequent and durable complete responses.

Then most recently in January 2023, the FDA accepted a biologics license application and granted priority review for glofitamab for the treatment of adult patients with relapsed or refractory large B-cell lymphoma after 2 or more lines of systemic therapy.

Transcription:

0:08 | Glofitamab is a CD3/CD20 bispecific T-cell engager. We have had a plethora of agents that target CD19 on the B cells, such as the [chimeric antigen receptor] T-cell therapies and the antibody drug conjugate loncastuximab [Zynlonta]. Then, we have tafasitamab [Monjuvi] the CD19 antibody, but with that sort of CD19 antigen, there are a lot of issues in the relapsed or refractory setting. New versions of quite a few of the bispecific T-cell engagers are coming out that will target CD3 and CD20, and glofitamab is 1 of them. This will be tested in large B-cell lymphomas in the relapsed or refractory setting. We [at AHN] participated in the clinical trial as well.