How PARP Inhibitors Have Changed Ovarian Cancer Care

Ursula A. Matulonis, MD, the chief of the Division of Gynecologic Oncology at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, explains how the treatment paradigm of ovarian cancer has evolved with abundance of PARP inhibitors.

Ursula A. Matulonis, MD, the chief of the Division of Gynecologic Oncology at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, explains how the treatment paradigm of ovarian cancer has evolved with abundance of PARP inhibitors.

According to Matulonis, there are currently 3 approved PARP inhibitors for ovarian cancer treatment, niraparib (Zejula), olaparib (Lynparza), and rucaparib (Rubraca). Each of these 3 agents have overlapping approvals, especially in the recurrent, platinum-sensitive setting. In this setting, all 3 have identical approvals as a maintenance therapy after chemotherapy.

In this setting, patients can begin these PARP inhibitors after their blood count goes back up and they are in remission and can remain on them until toxicities or progression, according to Matulonis. This is in comparison to the earlier-line settings where it can be used for a maximum of 2 years. Additionally, all 3 of these inhibitors have approvals as treatment for BRCA mutated, heavily pretreated ovarian cancer.