Mechanisms of Resistance to TKI in NSCLC

November 10, 2018
D. Ross Camidge, MD, PhD

D. Ross Camidge, MD, PhD, director of thoracic oncology, University of Colorado, discusses mechanisms of resistance to TKIs in oncogene-driven non–small cell lung cancer.

D. Ross Camidge, MD, PhD, director of thoracic oncology, University of Colorado, discusses mechanisms of resistance to TKIs in oncogene-driven non—small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).

Even though osimertinib (Tagrisso) is better in the brain than the other agents in this class, it is not a perfect central nervous system (CNS) drug, Camidge says. It is marketed as a CNS penetrant, but patients still progress on osimertinib. Researchers have to decide if this is a dosing situation with osimertinib or if there are simply better drugs in the future. Studies have looked at adding erlotinib (Tarceva) and gefitinib (Iressa) to treatment, but Camidge notes this works in a petri dish but not in a patient.

Some mechanisms of resistance are understood by thoracic oncologists. For example, some patients withEGFR