Moving Forward in Multiple Myeloma Research

Paul G. Richardson, MD, discusses what is expected and exciting for the future of multiple myeloma research.

Paul G. Richardson, MD, clinical program leader and director for Clinical Research, Jerome Lipper Multiple Myeloma Center, institute physician at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, and RJ Corman professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School, discusses what is expected and exciting for the future of multiple myeloma research.

In the past few years, numerous therapies have been granted FDA approval for the treatment of patients with multiple myeloma, including belantamab mafodotin (Blenrep), melphalan flufenamide (Melflufen). Chimeric antigen receptor T-cell therapies consisting of idecabtagene vicleucel (ide-cel; Abecma), and ciltacabtagene autoleucel (cilta-cel; Carvykti) are also now FDA-approved, .

As experts work towards advancements in this space, Richardson explains that what he most looks forward to in regard to new approaches is the continued development of cellular therapies

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0:08 | In myeloma, which is my point focus, what really excites me is the continued development of cellular therapies until continued development of immune strategies that can overcome immune dysfunction in myeloma, which is important not only for the disease itself, but also for complications such as infection. As we think about new approaches, we have to be thinking about approaches that are real world, practical, deliverable, and take away from complicated intensive care, hospital type settings, and deliver care directly to our community practices so that they can be most effective in making an impact in the broader sense in the disease. That's an area of research, particularly given the pandemic, that has become very important.