PARP Inhibition Improves Outcomes in Patients With BRCA-Mutated Ovarian Cancer

David O'Malley, MD, discusses the role of PARP inhibitors in the treatment landscape of ovarian cancer.

David O'Malley, MD, professor in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at The Ohio State University College of Medicine, and director of the Division of Gynecologic Oncology at The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center–The James, discusses the role of PARP inhibitors in the treatment landscape of ovarian cancer.

We now know there is a group of patients who will benefit remarkably from the use of PARP inhibitors, and that includes patients who have either a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation, says O’Malley. Whenever a survival advantage is seen, we know it is going to be beneficial. It is clear now that this group of patients with BRCA1/2-mutant ovarian cancer will benefit from PARP inhibitors, and they should receive these therapies earlier on.

There are 3 PARP inhibitors now available in the treatment landscape for ovarian cancer, with the most recent approval of niraparib (Zejula) in the frontline setting for adult patients who are in a complete or partial response to first-line platinum-based chemotherapy. According to O’Malley, PARP inhibitors should be given in the frontline setting for patients harboring a BRCA1/2 mutation, but if they do not receive it in their first-line of therapy and receive a platinum instead, they should be receiving a PARP inhibitor in the platinum-sensitive, recurrent setting.

<< View more resources and information in ovarian cancer