The Potential of Rebastinib in Platinum-Resistant Ovarian Cancer Treatment

Erika Hamilton, MD, discusses the mechanism of action of rebastinib, which is currently being explored in combination with weekly paclitaxel 1b/2 study of patients with platinum-resistant ovarian cancer.

Erika Hamilton, MD, director of the Breast Cancer and Gynecologic Cancer Research Program and principal investigator at Sarah Cannon Research Institute, discusses the mechanism of action of rebastinib, which is currently being explored in combination with weekly paclitaxel 1b/2 study of patients with platinum-resistant ovarian cancer.

Rebastinib is a switch control inhibitor that targets the TIE2 pathway. A hypothesis about its ability to enhance the effects of weekly paclitaxel lead to its use in this study.

Transcription:

0:08 | This was a study of weekly paclitaxel in combination with rebastinib. Rebastinib is an oral drug that inhibits TIE2. This is in the angiogenesis pathway, so you can think of it like a VEGF [pathway], except it hits a few additional targets as well. So [it is] a proven strategy for ovarian cancer targeting with both chemotherapy and an antiangiogenesis drug.