Dr. Kearns Discusses PSA Genetic Correction in Prostate Cancer

September 3, 2015
James Kearns, MD

James Kearns, MD, discusses genetic correction of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and how it can reduce the number of patients diagnosed with potentially insignificant prostate cancer

Kearns and his team found that about 42% of patients who had a PSA of greater than four at diagnosis would have been corrected below PSA of four in this study. If PSA had been corrected at the start, this group would have not required a prostate biopsy or received a diagnosis of prostate cancer, adds Kearns.

The surgical cohort consisted of patients who had Gleason 6, Gleason 7 and Gleason 8-10 prostate cancer. Within the first group, 18% of patients would not have been biopsied, compared to 17% in the second group and 5% in the third.

James Kearns, MD, resident of urology, University of Chicago, discusses genetic correction of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and how it can reduce the number of patients diagnosed with potentially insignificant prostate cancer. Kearns provides results from both the Surgical and Active Surveillance cohorts.