Dr. Mark Robson on How DNA-Damaging Agents Function in Treating Breast Cancer

November 24, 2015
Mark Robson, MD

Mark Robson, MD, clinic director of the Clinical Genetics Service, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, talks about how DNA-damaging agents function in treating breast cancer.

Mark Robson, MD, clinic director of the Clinical Genetics Service, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, talks about how DNA-damaging agents function in treating breast cancer.

Robson says the idea behind the treatment is specifically to exploit a defect in a particular repair pathway; when double-stranded damage is done to the DNA. He says another option to make DNA-damaging agents work is to create damage abnormalities that require double strand repair pathways.

Robson adds that these agents stand in contrast to PARP inhibitors, which are still being investigated by researchers to determine how they function.