Examining the Impact of the FLAURA Trial in EGFR-Mutant NSCLC

Zofia Piotrowska, MD, MHS, discusses the rationale for conducting the FLAURA trial in patients with&nbsp;<em>EGFR</em>-mutant non&ndash;small cell lung cancer and how the use of osimertinib impacted the treatment landscape for this patient population.

Zofia Piotrowska, MD, MHS, a medical oncologist at Massachusetts General Hospital and an instructor at Harvard Medical School, discusses the rationale for conducting the FLAURA trial in patients withEGFR-mutant non—small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and how the use of osimertinib (Tagrisso) impacted the treatment landscape for this patient population.

FLAURA was a large randomized phase III trial that was conducted in multiple countries. It aimed to answer the question of which EGFR inhibitor is best for frontline use in patients withEGFR-mutant NSCLC. At the time the study was conducted, first- and second-generation EGFR inhibitors were the standard of care, but Piotrowska says many patients who progressed on these drugs went on to develop theT790Mresistance mutations in EGFR.

For these patients, osimertinib appeared to work as an excellent second-line option. The agent had a great safety profile, says Piotrowska, as well as low rates of diarrhea and rash. The agent also had good central nervous system penetration, so all of this activity led investigators to wonder if it would be a better option in the first-line setting.

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