MRI and Recurrence Rates in Women With DCIS

October 1, 2013
Melissa L. Pilewskie, MD

Melissa L. Pilewskie, MD, assistant attending physician, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, gives an overview of the background and results from a study that analyzed perioperative MRI and recurrence rates in women with DCIS.

Melissa L. Pilewskie, MD, assistant attending physician, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, gives an overview of the background and results from a study that analyzed perioperative MRI and recurrence rates in women with DCIS.

This large retrospective study was done to evaluate the association of MRI and long-term outcomes, meaning locoregional recurrence and contralateral breast cancer in women with DCIS. Researchers found that there was no difference between the rates of locoregional recurrence and those women with or without a perioperative MRI at 5 and 8 years. There was also no significant difference observed in the rates of locoregional recurrence at 5 or 8 years in women who did not have radiation therapy, though theoretically these patients would benefit most from the addition of MRI. There was also no difference in the rates of contralateral breast cancer between women with and without MRI.

Clinical Pearls

Ultimately, Pilewskie says, these data add to the literature that MRI use for women with DCIS is not associated with improved outcomes.

  • This study was done to evaluate the association of perioperative MRI and long-term outcomes
  • There was no association observed between perioperative MRI and locoregional recurrence rates for patients with DCIS, even when radiotherapy was not given