Practice Changing Updates in the EGFR+ and KRAS+ NSCLC Space

Andreas Saltos, MD, discusses the current space for patients with non-small cell lung cancer harbording EGFR and KRAS mutations.

Andreas Saltos, MD, medical oncologist and clinical research medical director in the department of thoracic oncology at Moffitt Cancer Center, discusses the current space for patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) harbording EGFR and KRAS mutations.

According to Saltos, since the start of a phase 1/1B trial (NCT01859026) which was created to examine the efficacy and safety of the combination of erlotinib (Tarceva) and binimetinib (Mektovi) for patients with EGFR- and KRAS-mutated NSCLC, a lot has changed. One of these developments includes a new approved inhibitor, osimertinib (Tagrisso).

Investigators continue to evaluate new combinations and trials for patients with NSCLC that harbor KRAS and EGFR mutations.

Transcription:

0:08 | Things have changed a lot since this study started. [Since this] study launched, things have changed a bit. We now have multiple approved EGFR inhibitors, including, most recently, a third generation of osimertinib [Tagrisso] which is more selective for the EGFR, and is currently our standard of care for those patients.

0:35 | In the KRAS space, especially about a year ago, things have changed dramatically with the approval of the first G12C specific KRAS inhibitor. Really, the novel mechanism of shooting KRAS through these binding pockets and specific mutants really transformed our ability to target KRAS in a way that we didn't have 5 or 7 years ago.