Rashdan Explores the Safety/Efficacy of Osimertinib and SABR in EGFR+ NSCLC

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Sawsan Rashdan, MD, discusses the background, findings, and next steps of a phase 2 study evaluating treatment with osimertinib and consolidative SABR for the treatment of EGFR-mutated NSCLC.

Sawsan Rashdan, MD, assistant professor in the Department of Internal Medicine at UT Southwestern Medical Center, and a member of its Division of Hematology and Oncology, discusses the background, findings, and next steps of a phase 2 study (NCT03667820) evaluating treatment with osimertinib (Tagrisso) and consolidative stereotactic ablative radiation (SABR) for the treatment of EGFR-mutated non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).

Findings from the study were recently presented at the 2024 ASCO Annual Meeting.

Transcription:

0:09 | Our study looked at adding radiation to osimertinib, which is a very well-tolerated treatment for non–small cell lung cancer. And the goal of this study was to delay the emergence of acquired resistance that happens commonly after osimertinib treatment. Adding SABR to osimertinib was thought to be a well-tolerated treatment that can prolong survival and give the patients good quality of life.

0:38 | We found that the addition of SABR to osimertinib improved progression-free survival, and improved overall survival, as compared to the historical control from the FLAURA study [NCT02296125] with single-agent osimertinib. We also found that adding SABR to osimertinib was well-tolerated and feasible. We found that this treatment was pretty safe. The grade 3 or more toxicities were very minimal. Only 1 case of pneumonitis, 1 case of paronychia, 1 case of elevated liver enzymes, 1 case of diarrhea. But you know, it was very well-tolerated.

1:21 | The takeaway would be that we should always look for more options that can improve survival and are tolerated and can give the patients a good quality of life. I think there is a huge unmet need in this area, in EGFR-positive non–small cell lung cancer. I think our study does give a hint that maybe adding SABR to an EGFR inhibitor can actually prolong survival, and can be very well-tolerated.

1:59 | Our study was a single-arm study, non-randomized, [with a] small number of patients. So the next step would be to verify these data with repeating this study in a larger scale or randomized fashion. That would be our next step.



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