Research Looks to Improve Outcomes in TP53-Mutant AML and MDS

Melhem Solh, MD, discusses his research on post-transplant outcomes of patients with TP53-mutant acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome.

Melhem Solh, MD, medical director for the Cellular Therapy Program at Northside Hospital, discusses his research on post-transplant outcomes of patients with TP53-mutant acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS).

Investigators, including Solh, examined 30 patients to evaluate overall survival (OS), relapse and non-relapse mortality, and disease-free survival (DFS) in patients with AML or MDS with a TP53 mutation and who had underwent an allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant for this indication.

Due to the poor outcomes and survival rates seen for these patients, Sohl notes that the purpose of this trial is to further understand and improve options in this patient population.

Transcription:

0:08 | In this presentation, we looked at a group of patients who have AML [or] high-risk MDS who underwent an allogeneic transplant in our program for this indication. We looked at several end points, including OS, DFS, relapse and non-relapse mortality.

0:31 | The reason we're doing this is because patients who have TP53, which is a tumor suppressor gene on chromosome 17, tend to have very poor outcomes. If you look at patients with AML and MDS, their outcomes are usually very low and 1-year survival is very low. Even with transplant, historically, it's been reported to be less than 30%.

0:57 | Now, at this day and age, the improvement in attachment outcomes is newer medications that we can use to help get patients into deeper remission before transplant. That question [is], can we save some of these patients by taking them to an allogeneic transplant?