The Importance of Research on Rare Subtypes of Melanoma

Jason J. Luke, MD

Jason J. Luke, MD, assistant professor of medicine at the The University of Chicago Medicine, discusses the importance of conducting research into less common subsets of melanoma. After giving a talk on non-cutaneous melanoma, a rare subtype, Luke explained that not all cases of melanoma arise on the skin and shared why more research is necessary in the field.

Jason J. Luke, MD, assistant professor of medicine at the The University of Chicago Medicine, discusses the importance of conducting research into less common subsets of melanoma. After giving a talk on non-cutaneous melanoma, a rare subtype, Luke explained that not all cases of melanoma arise on the skin and shared why more research is necessary in the field.

Melanoma can arise in other parts of the body that are not exposed to the sun, including the uvula tract of the eye, and mucosal surfaces, such as the gynecologic tract or gastrointestinal tract. Additionally, acral melanomas can arise on pressure-dependent surfaces that are not exposed to the sun, says Luke.

These subtypes of melanoma arise from melanocytes, a type of melanoma cells. The biology of melanocytes are different than other types of melanoma.