CheckMate-77T Trial Results From ESMO 2023

Opinion
Video

Medical professionals discuss perspectives on CheckMate-77T trial results and potential impacts on clinical practice.

This is a video synopsis/summary of a Precision Medicine featuring Patrick Forde, MBBCh, and Tina Cascone, MD, PhD.

Forde and Cascone discuss the CheckMate -77T trial, the first phase 3 study to evaluate nivolumab in a perioperative setting for non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The trial showed significantly improved pathologic complete response (pCR) rates, with the highest rate among all studies at approximately 25% in the chemotherapy plus nivolumab arm. The event-free survival (EFS) was also significantly improved, with a HR of 0.58, identical to that of KEYNOTE-671.

These results suggest that 4 cycles of neoadjuvant nivolumab plus chemotherapy followed by adjuvant nivolumab provide similar outcomes to chemotherapy plus pembrolizumab followed by adjuvant pembrolizumab. The additional benefit of the adjuvant component remains a question, as patients who achieve pCR after neoadjuvant therapy in CheckMate -816 have excellent outcomes, with a 3-year survival rate exceeding 95%. The perioperative approach and use of adjuvant therapy may be beneficial for patients who do not achieve pCR, but strong data supporting this is not yet available.

Video synopsis is AI-generated and reviewed by Targeted Oncology™ editorial staff.

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